“…yet it was good of you to share in my troubles…”

The unexpected and unanticipated is often part of life here.  Yesterday I was talking to a man who noted to me how he was envious of “the slow pace of  bush-life’. Tempted to make a slight correction to that statement, I refrained instead, smiled to myself in thinking of the last few weeks with their frenetic pace and the Sara Groves tune oft upon my lips, “I am finite I come to an end!” or thoughts of frequent prayers for peace, grace and strength to face what each day in Kurungu may hold, never knowing exactly what will or might transpire in a 24 hour timeframe. In the last few weeks we have treated many patients, grated the air strip, prepared a soccer pitch, fought off 2 giant (8 ft) spitting cobras, organized an outreach visit to Longerin (trying to calm the patients who  stampeding to access medicine),organized a plane for a babe with hydrocephalus, started Sunday School, continued with Mama’s meetings and this in addition to the usual, ordinary life of homeschool and four children and the incredible culinary challenges (for me) of having to make bread from scratch or figure what to eat from dwindling supplies (yes, I can get fancy with one egg, some mealy flour and cocoa!)…

If it were a fairy tale world, I might have recalled how last Sunday Jay whisked me away to Kijabe to celebrate our anniversary!  That is the joke I make now of his unexpected mystery illness which brought about an emergent medical flight out of Kurungu. What had simply appeared as Jay ‘overdoing things’ onThursday, progressed to fever, rash and jaundice by Sunday. Within a few hours from an early morning email requesting diagnostic help, we had packed, shut down the house, left instructions, boarded a plane (thank you AIM AIR), rode in a car (thank you John Haspels!) and arrived at Kijabe Hospital to see the figure of Dr. Pete waiting at the entrance. There is no way to describe the kindness and generosity we have felt in our few days here. Words will fail if I were to but try. We are humbled by the genuine love of the Kijabe community that mirrors the relentless unconditional love of the Father.  We can say, as Paul had to the Phillipian church, “…It was good of you to share in my troubles… you sent me aid again and again when I was in need” (Phillipians 4:14,17). With grateful hearts we give thanks to God in His grace for Jay’s recovery and to the believers around us who have poured out their love upon us with the same lavishness the speaks of the Father.